Reinhard G. Pauly

Fellow: Awarded 1960

Field of Study: Music Research

Competition: US & Canada

Born in Breslau, Germany, in 1920, Reinhard Pauly was an ardent student of music before he came to the United States at the age of seventeen. He earned a B.A. (cum laude, 1942), and after working in military intelligence in the U.S. Army during World War II, an M.A. in music history (1948) from Columbia University. He received his Ph.D. from Yale University in 1956, and continued to teach at Lewis & Clark College. He was promoted to full professor in 1962. Mr. Pauly retired in 1985 and is currently Professor Emeritus of Music. He played both violin and viola in the New Haven and Oregon Symphony orchestras, Portland Baroque Orchestra, and Portland Festival Symphony. He undertook further violin studies at the Musikakademie in Vienna and lectured at the Mozarteum in Salzburg. In addition to his teaching and performing, Mr. Pauly has contributed to his field as a member of the national council of the American Musicological Society and as a judge of Metropolitan Opera auditions. He served on the board of directors of the Portland Opera. He has also had significant impact as a researcher, contributing articles to such respected journals as Musical Quarterly, Notes, Music and Letters, Journal of the American Musicological Society, Salzburger Nachrichten, Journal of Church Music, and the New Grove Dictionary of Music. He has published a plethora of sheet music as well as Music in the Classic Period (1965); Music and Theatre: An Introduction to Opera (1970); and beginning in 1959 arranged the Michael Haydn Choral Series. A number of his publications have not only gone through multiple editions but have been translated into several languages. During his Guggenheim Fellowship term, he conducted a study of the sacred music of Johann Ernst Eberlin. Given his extensive experience as teacher, researcher, writer, and performer, it was not surprising that after retirement from Lewis & Clark in 1985 Timber Press in Portland asked him to be the general editor for its new classical music imprint, Amadeus Press. During his tenure there, he facilitated the publication of forty books on classical and traditional music.